Christian Zacharias, piano
THU, OCT 27, 2016 | 8PM

Christian Zacharias, praised by The New Yorker as “a pianist of ideas,” brings his keen insight to Beethoven’s energetic Piano Concerto No. 1. Explore how the ambitious young Beethoven filled the void left by Mozart—who penned the noble Overture to La Clemenza di Tito in the final months of his life—and track Beethoven’s ripples as they reach Georges Bizet, already an impressive symphonist at 17 when he composed his Symphony in C. Like Beethoven, the composer-performer Jessie Montgomery infuses her sparkling scores with the expertise she has gleaned as an elite violinist.

MOZART: OVERTURE TO LA CLEMENZA DI TITO
BEETHOVEN: PIANO CONCERTO NO. 1
J. MONTGOMERY: RECORDS FroM A VANISHING CITY
BIZET: SYMPHONY IN C MAJOR
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Fazil Say, piano
SAT, DEC 3, 2016 | 7PM

Turkish pianist and composer Fazil Say rejoins Orpheus after a triumphant tour that visited New York and Europe in 2015. This evening of luxury & levity features Say performing Mozart’s sophisticated Piano Concerto No. 21, including the gorgeous slow movement popularized by the classic Swedish film,Elvira Madigan. Say also performs his own Silk Road, an engrossing piano concerto inspired by folk music found along the ancient trade route from China to Europe. In the overture to La Scala di Seta, Rossini dishes out humor related to a silk ladder and its key role in an operatic love triangle. Haydn’s Symphony No. 83 earned its nickname, “The Hen,” from its fits of lighthearted clucking.

ROSSINI: OVERTURE TO LA SCALA DI SETA (THE SILK LADDER)
MOZART: CONCERTO FOR PIANO NO. 21, K.467
F. SAY: PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2, OP. 4 “SILK ROAD”
HAYDN: SYMPHONY NO. 83, “LA POULE” (THE HEN)
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Vadim Gluzman, violin
SAT, FEB 4, 2017 | 7PM

When the Ukrainian-born Israeli violinist Vadim Gluzman appeared with Orpheus in 2011, The New York Times praised a performance that “balanced thoughtfulness and visceral power.” Gluzman will be performing on the very same 1690 ‘ex-Leopold Auer’ Stradivarius for which the concerto was composed. Mendelssohn’s symphonic recollections of Scotland fill the concert hall with splashes of local color and long lost folk melodies while composer Michael Hersch reflects on sketches by artist Kevin Tuttle as he processes the impacts of physical illness and mortality.

MENDELSSOHN: SYMPHONY NO. 3, “SCOTTISH”
M. HERSCH: End Stages (Premiere)
TCHAIKOVSKY: VIOLIN CONCERTO
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Alisa Weilerstein, cello
SAT, MAR 18, 2017 | 7PM

When the young American cellist Alisa Weilerstein first appeared with Orpheus in 2010, her genius was beyond question—a quality the MacArthur Foundation confirmed the next year when they awarded her a Fellowship (a.k.a. “genius grant”) and declared her “a consummate performer, combining technical precision with impassioned musicianship.” While Schumann’s Cello Concerto is the product of a brilliant composer on the brink of insanity, bright talents found their voices early in Mendelssohn’s refreshing Nocturno for winds, Webern’s aphoristic Five Movements for strings, and Schubert’s elegant symphonic salute to the powerful influences of Rossini, Haydn and Mozart.

MENDELSSOHN: NOCTURNO FOR WINDS
SCHUMANN: CONCERTO FOR CELLO
WEBERN: FIVE MOVEMENTS FOR STRINGS
SCHUBERT: SYMPHONY NO. 6

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